Ben’s Farm Shops are always on the lookout for solutions to tackle the single-use plastic issue and here’s another one that they hope is going to prove popular with customers. If you’re looking for an environmentally sustainable alternative to clingfilm without the bulkiness of Tupperware, then these organic cotton and beeswax food wraps will be right up your street. These colourful little numbers come from Cambridge based supplier Bee Bee wraps. Bee Bee is the brainchild of Kath Austin,who, inspired by a conversation with a friend (and the fact that cotton and beeswax has been used as a food wrapping tool for centuries) started experimenting in her kitchen with various formulas until she hit upon the perfect one…and the Bee Bee wrap was born.

The wraps are ethical and sustainable from cotton grower to production, with the company working closely with their beekeeping communities to perpetuate the pollinating population and they aim to be zero waste in everything that they do.

Simply made from organic cotton, beeswax, tree resin and organic jojoba oil, the wraps are completely compostable but if cared for properly, each wrap will last at least a year. They are breathable and won’t cause food to ‘sweat’, therefore increasing the shelf life and cutting food wastage to boot. Bee Bee uses low impact dyes and is confident that, whilst the wraps have a beautiful ‘beeswaxy’ scent, this does not taint food at all and does fade with use.

To care for your wrap and get the very best from it, hand wash in cold water and ensure any food to be covered is cold before doing so. Bee bee wraps are not suitable for use in microwaves, dishwashers or washing machines and you should avoid wrapping raw meat and fish in them. They are very malleable when warm so use warm hands to mould them and create a breathable seal around your food – once they have cooled down they will hold their shape.

The wraps are available from any Ben’s Farm Shops.

 



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Share Shed wins the People’s Projects

The Share Shed, Totnes’ library of things, has won £48,599 from the National Lottery Community Fund in this year’s Peoples Projects competition. Its success means it can now become the world’s first mobile sharing library.

Share Shed staff and volunteers were told the news, live on ITV, last Thursday, following a public vote in the first two weeks of April.

The Share Shed will now go mobile - extending its service beyond Totnes to Ashburton, Buckfastleigh, Dartington, South Brent and the villages around, supporting a more sustainable and collaborative lifestyle.

Mirella Ferraz, Share Shed Coordinator said: “We’re thrilled to have won the grant, especially in this case, which highlights how many people supported our project! We’re very grateful to every single person who voted for us”.

The Share Shed offers over 300 useful items for people to borrow. Its collection includes tools, camping gear, gardening equipment, cooking appliances, sewing machines and much more.

The Share Shed is at 16 High Street, Totnes, and is open on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 2pm to 4pm, and on Saturdays from 10am to 1pm. To see everything the library of things offers, visit www.shareshed.org.uk.

Mirella adds “We’re overwhelmed by the support we’ve received – and we’d love to have even more volunteers involved with our project. Supporting the Share Shed is a great way to help people whilst saving a lot of natural resources. If you’d like to get involved, please get in touch via info@shareshed.org.uk”.

Transition Town Film Festival 18

Transition Town Film Festival 18 VISIONING THE FUTURE is our fourth film festival.
We have an amazing array of new or rarely seen films with real power and importance for our lives and communities - about climate change, our food, our politics, our environment, our wildlife - and our future. For the first time, the festival is being held over five days at three cinemas. At the Totnes Cinema there are three showings: Faces Places, Agnes Varda’s latest film and Ai Weiwei’s Human Flow, as well as a poetry, film and music event with Matt Harvey and jazz group Shadow Factory. Plus FREE cafe style screenings of short films by the Next Generation. The Barn Cinema at Dartington shows Bruce Parry’s Tawai as well as Albatross, revealing the effects of plastic on albatross chicks. At the Civic Hall The Worm is Turning charts the effects of chemical agriculture in India and In our Hands explores the idea of food sovereignty. Disturbing the Peace follows the transformation of Israeli and Palestinian fighters, from soldiers to peace activists. Power Trip highlights how media and lobby groups shape the public perception of fracking. Saturday evening honours the life of filmmaker & ocean conservationist Rob Stewart with Revolution followed by the UK PREMIERE of Sharkwater Extinction, which investigates the corruption of the pirate fishing industry. Just 37, Rob tragically died while making this film; his work highlights the environmental threats posed to the oceans & the world and the ways in which young people are helping to find solutions. In the centenary year of some women getting the vote in the UK over half our films are F-Rated: a classification for any film directed or written by a woman. What Tomorrow Brings observes one year at a girls’ school in an Afghan village. The Barefoot Artist chronicles Lily Yeh, a community artist in troubled areas. Nearer to home, 9 of our 13 shorts by young people carry the F rating. Most screenings offer discussion time with film-makers or local experts, including Rob Hopkins, Jacqi Hodgson and Guy Watson. Plus there are four free workshops for children and adults. We are very excited about our programme. Check out our website www.transitionfilmfestival.org.uk and make it a date to come and join us!      

Totnes to Sharpham walk

By Coast & Country Cottages With the Totnes to Sharpham walk so picturesque, we just had to make a visual guide to show you the natural beauty of one of South Devons glorious walks. This moderately easy walk along along the Dart Valley trail takes you to Sharpham Vineyard, where you can sample locally-produced wine and cheese! The bustling ancient market town of Totnes is situated at head of the estuary of the River Dart, and is the starting point to The Dart Valley Trail. Read more.