Totnes Castle stands on a 17.5 meter high manmade motte, which looms over the historic medieval town of Totnes. From its battlements, it commands a splendid and picturesque view across the town below as well as offering scenic views of wild and rugged Dartmoor. Totnes Castle is steeped in a rich and varied history and is the one of the best surviving examples of a Norman motte and bailey castle. Both ‘motte’ and ‘bailey’ are old-French words, ‘motte’ meaning ‘hill’ or ‘mound’ while ‘bailey’ meaning ‘low yard’. Due to Totnes’s strategic position and close proximity to the River Dart, Totnes was a logical place to build a motte and bailey castle.

Totnes was a well-known port town and had a reputation of being one the best places to harbour a boat; this was due to how far a ship could navigate inland. Evidence of this can be found in a book called “Historia Regum Britanniae” which was written in 1136 by Geoffrey of Monmouth. With a port, Totnes became a fairly wealthy town, as a result of this influx of prosperity, King Edward the Elder in 907 had the town fortified, this resulted in Totnes becoming one of the only fortified towns in the South West, which is evidence that Totnes started to become distinctly affluent. However later on in the town’s history, the mint in Totnes at the time of 1036 (thirty years before the Norman Conquest) had ceased minting, which was an indication that the importance of the town had started to dwindle. Totnes was accorded with a royal charter by King John in 1206, which transformed Totnes into a free town. This meant that Totnes was allowed to formulate its own laws. However Totnes grew to be once again a very prosperous town and in 1523 it was the second richest town in Devon and sixteenth richest town in the whole of England.

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Treat your lovely mums in Totnes this Mother’s Day

There are so many ways to say ‘I love you’ to the important lady in your life. Whether you’d like some quiet time relaxing with just you and your mum or a more raucous affair with the whole family, there’s something and somewhere to suit all lifestyles and budgets in and around Totnes. Renowned for having many cafes and restaurants offering delicious, local and ethically sourced food and drink, you’ll find everything from a three course lunch to coffee & cake both in and out of town, with TQ9 at The Royal Seven Stars, the Waterside Bistro and The White Hart at Dartington to name just a few. If you decide to treat your mum to a home cooked meal this year, why not pick up some fresh ingredients from one of the local delis or farm shops and prepare a tasty breakfast, lunch or dinner fit for a Queen. However much you want to spend, both Totnes High Street and the Shops at Dartington are full to brimming with perfect ways to show your lovely mums just how much they mean to you with some of the most unique gifts from a wide range of independent shops and retailers. From scented candles to wine, handmade fudge to pretty porcelain mugs, there’s something for all tastes and to suit all budgets. Visit Me and East, Firefly or Pagoda Interiors for something handmade and ethical, Timehouse for something retro, White Space or the Bowie Gallery for something arty, Colony for something funky or China Blue, Out of the Blue or the new Moon Stone Hare for something simply beautiful. If you’re looking for a fun day out for all the family why not visit Pennywell and mums will be treated to a complimentary cream tea, take a ride on the steam train at South Devon Railway or paint an ornament at China Blue. Or if you just want to spend some quality time together without any fuss then why not go for a walk along the River Dart, sit and relax on one of the benches and simply take the time to catch up with each other. Take a trip to the beautiful St. Mary’s Church to admire the architecture or visit one of the wonderful surrounding villages from Dittisham to Broadhempston or anywhere in between. Why not go ‘crabbing’ in Stoke Gabriel or walk around the stunning gardens on the Dartington Estate. Whatever you choose to do or however you show your appreciation you’ll be sure to find something truly magical here in Totnes. For more information please contact Samantha Branch on info@visittotnes.co.uk

A UK first in Totnes

Totnes has always attracted forward-thinking businesses with social responsibility at the core. Earth.Food.Love is the UK’s only, family-run, organic, bulk-buy, zero waste shop! Focusing on creating a better future, they decided to look back to the past, where eating real food with minimal packaging was normal practice. They believe returning to these simple ways will benefit not only our own health, but the planets too. The shop stocks a wide range of products such as grains, cereals, beans, legumes, flours, sugars, herbs, spices, loose leaf teas, nut butters, syrups, oils, vinegars, cleaning products and personal care products. Everything is self served and priced by weight, eliminating the toxic and wasteful packaging. Just take along any bottle, jar, tub or container; if it can be weighed, it can be used. Earth.Food.Love is located at 101 High St, to find out further information check out their website www.thezerowasteshop.co.uk. You can keep up to date by by liking their Facebook page.

The Dart and Totnes – Bridges and Bridgetown

Flowing from two sources on Dartmoor, down to the sea at Dartmouth, Totnes is an important stop along the River Dart situated between the moors and the river's mouth. The town offers an excellent jumping off point for exploration of the river whether by foot, boat or canoe, and is the point where it becomes tidal. Even for those who just want to admire the river without getting their feet wet there are many ways to enjoy the Dart, and many things Totnes has to thank the river for – and the two bridges crossing it. Bridges and Bridgetown Totnes Bridge has the honour of being the last bridge to cross the Dart before it reaches open sea, as plans to build a railway bridge across the river mouth from Kingswear to Dartmouth in the late 1900s never came to fruition. There have been multiple bridges across the river in Totnes beginning with a river ford and evolving to the familiar stone bridge today. It was once a toll bridge that separated Bridgetown from Totnes until it was opened up on October 31st 1881 for everyone to cross. A second bridge was built in 1982 and although less picturesque than the older bridge was necessary for the increasing amounts of traffic passing through Totnes and across the Dart. It is named the Brutus Bridge after the legendary founder of the town. Whichever side of the bridge you're on there are many places to enjoy the river from. Vire Island is worth a visit for anyone looking for a nice spot to enjoy a picnic. Although not a proper island the 400m peninsula is named after the French town Totnes is twinned with (not Narnia) and is the perfect spot for contemplating the river from in the summer. And there are plenty of restaurants  and cafes to eat or enjoy a drink in, high tide or low, rain or shine.